Title of Example: Grafik Dynamo
Link: http://www.turbulence.org/Works/dynamo/
Group Members: Mark Cavill, Danielle Bashore, Keith Vislay, Sarah Pastorek


Overview



Publication info:

Website-http://www.turbulence.org/Works/dynamo/
Title- Grafik Dynamo
Author- Kate Armstrong and Michael Tippett
Publication Info- New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. (2005)

Media format:

text/html

Genre:

open-ended narrative, social networking, dynamic

Audience:

Anyone who enjoys random work involving photographs and writing

MS Keyword:

Social Network, live feed, Flickr, LiveJournal, comic strip, random narrative

Descriptive/Analytical


Medium:

This is a combination of Flickr and LiveJournal images that are pulled from a live feed, which are then labeled with random text to create a comic book style narrative. The images will periodically refresh to give the audience an ever-changing experience. The site seems to have been built using html as opposed to flash or java.

Genre:

This genre is a combination of social networking and online fragmentation to dynamically display a type of open-ended narrative with a comic-book format.

Audience:

The audience can be very broad. Anyone who enjoys art would like this site. Also, people who enjoy random things put together, such as the images and the words. Also, anyone who enjoys comics.

Evaluation

The piece creates random narratives using seemingly haphazard images and text pulled from the mentioned sites. Sometimes the images work with the text, but usually they don't match up at all. We would have liked to see specifically labeled images matched with the same word to give the piece a little more continuity. Or perhaps all three of the images that are displayed could have had similar tags so that the entirety of each "section" was related.

This website could also be used as a remedy for writer's block. The absurdity of some of the strips could inspire writers to come up with an idea that they otherwise would not have thought of. It may have been the creators' intention for the audience to look at each picture as being the initial strip in a comic and then creating a subsequent storyline on their own.